Nobel Prize winner reveals secret to living a happy life

ORIGINAL URL: https://www.fromthegrapevine.com/health/daniel-kahneman-ted-interview-podcast-secret-happy-life

by Benyamin Cohen | Thursday, December 20, 2018

Daniel Kahneman says that nurturing our relationships is the key to success.

As we close out the final days of 2018, it’s a good time to take stock and ask: Are we happy? And, if not, what would make us happy? After all, the passage of time makes happiness a finite commodity. As Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, “For every minute you are angry, you lose sixty seconds of happiness.”

So how can we ensure that we’ll be happy in the new year? Well, for starters, you should take a look at our list of eight things that’s guaranteed to make you happy in 2019. Then, when you’re done with that, we suggest you heed the advice of Daniel Kahneman.

The 84-year-old Israeli professor and Nobel Prize winner has been called the world’s most influential living psychologist. He’s considered the father of “behavioral economics” – nearly every book in the “smart thinking” section of the bookstore is based on his work. (Admittedly, we may or may not have actually read Kahneman’s magnum opus.) Best-selling authdor Michael Lewis (“The Blind Side,” “Moneyball,” “The Big Short”) wrote a biography of Kahneman and his research partner, fellow Israeli psychologist Amos Tversky. “Their collaboration is all about the exploration of how the human mind actually works,” Lewis explained.

In an end-of-the-year interview, Kahneman reflected back on his career’s worth of research. And when asked about the secret to being happy, he revealed that it has to do with nurturing our relationships. “It’s primarily spending time with people you love, and who love you back,” he explained. “That’s what makes people happy in the moment.”

He continued: “What makes people satisfied with their lives is much more conventional. It’s having the sense that your life is meaningful. If you sense is that your life is meaningless, then you are probably depressed and you’re certainly very unhappy.”

The Tel Aviv native made the remarks during his appearance on the TED Interview, a new podcast series which goes into deeper conversations with famous TED Talk speakers. Kahneman’s original TED Talk has been viewed more than 5 million times:

Earlier this year, we chatted with a disciple of Kahneman. Tal Ben-Shahar is known as the professor of happiness and taught the most popular course in Harvard’s history. He elucidated Kahneman’s point by explaining that the most important determinant of our happiness is our relationship with others.

“Take, for example, Denmark,” he told us. “You know that 93% of Danes are members of social clubs? I find it fascinating. It could be members of their church or of their sailing club or golf, it doesn’t matter. But they are active members of social clubs. In other words, relationships, real relationships, is a priority.”

He went on to explain that it could be any type of relationship. “It could be a romantic relationship, it could be friends, it could be close relationships at work. It actually doesn’t matter, but you need those relationships. Now, it’s very important that those relationships are real, meaning they’re not virtual. Unfortunately, 1,000 friends on Facebook are no substitute for that one BFF. You need those face-to-face interactions that are so important.”
You can listen to our entire conversation with Ben-Shahar here:

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

PA organ-donor law aims at new hope

FRANKLIN COUNTY (Pa.) — Bob Thomas knows what it’s like waiting just to have the chance at a life-saving medical procedure.

Today, thousands of Pennsylvanians are on waiting lists for organ donations, and a new law that went on the books last month is providing them enhanced hope.

The Franklin County Commissioner knew the importance of organ donation in 2013, when he needed treatment for blood and bone marrow disease. Thomas’ need would be provided by a living donor, however he had already had the organ-donor designation on his Pennsylvania driver’s license for many years.

“When I was waiting for a match for my bone marrow transplant, I was told how many people don’t ever find a match,” Thomas said. “Ultimately they end up dying because they couldn’t find anything.

“It’s the same way with heart and lungs, et cetera.”

The Pennsylvania Organ Donation Law, signed by Gov. Tom Wolf in October, works to provide more access to organ donations, including tissue donations. It brings Pennsylvania up to date on the medical side, adding hands, facial tissue and limbs to the anatomical items that can be donated.

“Organ donation gives people the opportunity to live,” Thomas said. “It can save a life. The other life was already gone, but they’re still useful organs there to help others, whether it’s a heart or lungs or so many other things.

“As technology and medical advancements continue, there’s even more things they’re finding they can transplant, which is part of the reason for the update.”

The new law also will increase public education about the donation process and the importance of organ donation. Adults will have more of a chance to register as organ donors, and organ donor awareness will be heightened. A curriculum to be used in schools throughout the state will be developed.

Pennsylvania was seen as a front-runner in organ-donation laws in 1994, but it has taken nearly 25 years for an update to get through the legislature. The law brings the commonwealth into the group of 47 other states that have adopted the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act.

“This is the first change to our PA laws regarding organ donation in over two decades,” said Dr. Peter Jablin of Summit Pulmonology, who serves as Chambersburg Hospital’s Critical Care Services medical director.

“This is a prayer answered for the Pennsylvanians and their families who are anxiously waiting for the gift of life.”

The legislation also updates living will and health care power of attorney documents to authorize limited use of artificial support to preserve the opportunity for donation.

“This is a victory for the nearly 8,000 Pennsylvanians on the national transplant waiting list who now have renewed hope of a second chance at life,” said Susan Stuart, president and CEO of the Center for Organ Recovery and Education, or CORE, which is the federally designated not-for-profit organ-procurement organization that serves western Pennsylvania, including Franklin and Fulton counties.

“The act clarifies decision-making about donation by including the health care power of attorney designation in the authorization hierarchy. The bill specifically recognizes other relatives such as aunts, uncles, grandparents and grandchildren.”

While the Chambersburg Hospital doesn’t perform organ transplants, it does harvest organs for surgery elsewhere. Jablin believes the positive impact of the law will be right in our own backyard.

“The people who benefit live here, in our community,” Jablin said. “These are our neighbors who can finally walk down the aisle when their children marry, can finally see their grandchildren, can finally sing in church and live a life free of the constraints of dialysis.

“Recipients of organ transplants and their families, who had been suffering relentless decline, are now living with a new future.”

The law will now require a coroner to issue a written statement providing the reason he or she intends to deny recovery of all eligible organs when a death is under investigation. It also allows a transplant surgeon or designee to attend a meeting regarding denial of organ recovery.

“The update respects the authority of state coroners and protects criminal investigations, while also safeguarding the wishes of each donor or their family,” according to Stuart. “I believe the more rigorous documentation and discussion required for a denial, which this law outlines, will translate into more organs available for transplant.

“But the ultimate impacts of the new law will be more lives saved through organ donation, renewed hope of a second chance at life for those waiting, and the prospect of comfort from tragedy for so many grieving donor families who will now be safeguarded the opportunity of donation.”

The new law will also increase the voluntary contribution from $1 to $3, which motorists can make to The Governor Robert P. Casey Memorial Organ and Tissue Donation Awareness Trust Fund. The fund is the primary source of financial support for statewide education campaigns about organ, tissue and cornea donation, as well as support services for Pennsylvania donor families.

Stuart said the fund has been facing insolvency in recent years because of a decline in contributions. “It’s our hope that the $2 increase can make up for this gap,” she said.

Stuart also expects the new legislation to bolster the scope and effectiveness of the Organ and Tissue Donation Awareness Project. The organization provides grants to secondary schools that incorporate donation into their curriculums. The state education department will be required to provide a model curriculum about organ donation for use in grades 9 through 12.

The law sets in motion additional opportunities for people to become an organ donor.

A Donate Life PA Registry will be established to allow people to register as a donor online.

“We believe it was important to update the state’s organ-donor laws in order to continue to encourage organ donation in Pennsylvania,” said Nate Wardle, press secretary with the PA Department of Health.

The new law provides for changes to the Penn- DOT website that will provide more options and more information about organ donation, including providing written forms in English and Spanish. The health department is developing an informational insert for use at driver’s license centers, as well as adding information on its website about anatomical donation of hands, facial tissue and limbs.

“There is a lot of work currently being done by DOH and PennDOT, among many other groups and organizations, to encourage organ donation,” Wardle said.

A state-level Organ and Tissue Donation Advisory Committee will also be formed under the law.

“While this new law will save more lives, this legislation alone, as important as it is, remains insufficient when we consider the staggering number of Pennsylvanians who are right now waiting for a life-saving organ transplant,” Stuart said.

“It’s critical that all Pennsylvanians register as organ, tissue and cornea donors either at their local PennDOT offices or online at registerme.org.”

Organ-donor designation can be added to an existing driver’s license or ID card by visiting www.dmv.pa.gov and select the “Donate Life Pennsylvania” icon in the middle column of the page.

“Awareness within our community is crucial,” Jablin said. “Almost 50 people can benefit from one donor with gifts of lungs, heart, kidney, liver, pancreas, intestines, corneas and tissue.

“When you really know the urgent needs of people waiting for the gift of life, naturally your perspective changes and your heart opens up.”

Thomas said he is now in as good of health as he’s ever been. A match was never found, but a half match with his daughter and new medical technology did the job.

“There’s no question,” Thomas said. “That process clearly saved my life, and I’m in as good a position as I’ve ever been in my life. I’m very healthy and everything is good.”

For more information on bone marrow donation, visit bethematch.org.

More information on organ and tissue donation in Pennsylvania can be found at www. donatelifepa.org.

https://www.heraldmailmedia.com/news/tri_state/pennsylvania/pa-organ-donor-law-aims-at-new-hope/article_d025fa58-25c9-53f0-beec-5af418a93109.html

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

I have #KidneyDisease, but it is not who I am. Donor4Luis.com

I was blessed to have the opportunity of wearing my Donor4Luis.com t-shirt to the Forum to see The Eagles. WoW! What a show.

I have made it a point to not let the constraints of kidney disease define who I am. I positively believe I will receive the kidney that I need; it is my intention to help and inspire others who are in the midst of this same battle.

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

Life is too short not to celebrate nice moments! -Jurgen Klopp

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.


It’s not about guilt, it’s about being happy all year long

ORIGINAL URL: https://www.reddeerexpress.com/opinion/its-not-about-guilt-its-about-being-happy-all-year-long/

Dec. 28, 2018 3:30 p.m.COLUMNISTSOPINION

This time of year puts everything against us when it comes to being healthy and lean

This time of year, I can sound like Scrooge, but please understand that I am sitting here right now with a glass of eggnog writing this (literally).

Yes, I own a gym and I have been a trainer for over 20 years. Yes, I am a huge fan of eating well and exercising, and I do in fact, think that it is the key to a long, healthy, vibrant life. I absolutely know for a fact that being healthier is more fun than being unhealthy. I know that being fit and ‘ready to go’ so I can do anything at any moment is more fun than being broken, unfit and overweight. I have personally tried out both.

At this time of year, I too have a war going on. We are surrounded, inundated by opportunities to indulge in every little craving, sweet treat, fatty, delicious homemade something-or-other. All the ads on TV, the radio, signs as we drive, flyers in our mailbox etc., are all full of amazing looking ‘comfort food’.

I want the best for you all year, not just right now. I also want you to be a human and enjoy the treats of the season and I want you to do it without being devastated and loaded with guilt afterwards.

This time of year puts everything against us when it comes to being healthy and lean. Waist destroying food everywhere, and then you factor in the shopping, parties, family, and work that all seem to accelerate and intensify, leaving even less time to work out. Somehow we need to have limits, guidelines and things in place to save ourselves from, well, ourselves!

Enjoy in moderation: This is my personal biggest hurdle. Once I have a sip of eggnog, I want to drink it all day, every day. Fat and sugar. Our body is designed to LOVE this stuff, especially in the winter – because it makes us fat, and that keeps us warm and protects us from starving in the leanest food supply time. Well, it WAS the leanest food supply time back when we lived in caves and didn’t have electricity, and let’s face it, the human body has not changed since then. We still genetically desire a food increase in winter, it’s pretty much hard wired. So we have to override that instinct and have limits. Have water with you at all times, flavour it if you need to. Snack on raw veggies all day. Plan and pre-make your meals.

Know Thyself: If you are an all or nothing person, then accept that. If you are in good shape, until you have one chocolate, and then you are sucked in and can’t stop until you have eaten every last one, then you have a different set of rules than someone who can ‘take it or leave it’. You need to stay strong, or only have that treat at the end of the party, when the chance of having too many is pretty much gone. Or buy in super small quantities, then have them all and be done.

Keep Moving: Exercise can NOT fall off the plans right now especially! Those extra calories are either going to be burned off, or packed on, you choose! Make fitness a huge priority! Make it part of the plans for every day, do something, anything, a walk after supper, an early morning class before everything goes haywire, a quick lunch workout, or a class after work and before supper.

Drink more water than usual: This will not only help you feel less hungry, which can help with the temptations, but will also keep you flushed and clear of all the residue from that strange food you have been putting away.

Laugh a LOT: This time of year can really be FUN! I encourage you to laugh a lot, have a blast, sing Christmas songs out loud, get together with those you love most and really enjoy the gift of life.

If you gain a few pounds, okay, no worries, but if you gain 20 or 30, it just makes January harder, so please, for your own happiness, two weeks from now, stay on target (mostly). It’s not about guilt, it’s about being happy all year.

Happy Training!

Scott McDermott is a personal trainer and the owner of Best Body Fitness in Sylvan Lake.

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

Helping people who don’t have what we have

AUTHOR ALBERTON RECORD

From a small seed of an idea from an eight-year-old, there can be endless opportunities to make a difference in the lives of children

“HOW can we help people who don’t have what we have, mommy?”

That was the question that sparked the growth of this joint initiative of Century 21 Properties and LG Gouveia Attorney.

“My eight-year-old daughter, Gabby was touched when a representative from the Door of Hope attended their school and she decided that day she wanted to make a difference in people’s lives,” Leila Gouveia, owner of LG Gouveia Attorney said.

“Gabby chose to do a Christmas charity drive and chose the Door of Hope because babies are close to her heart and she said babies cannot speak for themselves so we need to be their voice and protect our young, love them and nurture them. We have the utmost respect for the work this organisation does,” Leila continued.

“We have received several donations from private individuals for which we are grateful. On a corporate level, Century 21 Properties (Glenvista; Alberton; Meyerton) have graciously joined this initiative to assist.”

The two companies have elected the Door of Hope as their charity of choice for the year of 2019. They will continue throughout the year to run charitable drives to collect the necessities for the children at the Door of Hope. Century 21 Properties and LG Gouveia Attorneys will commence their drive with a Christmas donation of R10 0000 of baby essentials.

Please look out for the charity drives that will take place in the community next year for the benefit of the Door of Hope.

From a small seed of an idea from an eight-year-old, can grow endless opportunities to go into the community, do selfless acts of kindness to make a difference in the lives of children and people who are less fortunate and in need. Something that can mean so little to someone can mean the world to another, so remember no selfless act is too small.

For free daily local news in the south, visit our sister newspapers Alberton Record, Comaro Chronicle, Southern Courier and Get it Joburg South Magazine.

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https://albertonrecord.co.za/195161/helping-people-who-dont-have-what-we-have/

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

I have #KidneyDisease, but it is not who I am. Donor4Luis.com

I did a night run in Pomona, CA where there was music and lots of people running for a good cause. On this 5k I didn’t finish dead last! I keep on training and pretty soon I know I will be able without being tired because of dialysis.

I have made it a point to not let the constraints of kidney disease define who I am. I positively believe I will receive the kidney that I need; it is my intention to help and inspire others who are in the midst of this same battle.

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

Life is a journey. When we stop, things don’t go right. -Pope Francis

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

Being happy amidst it all

ORIGINAL URL: https://www.clintonnc.com/news/36060/being-happy-amidst-it-all

By Becky Spell Vann – Contributing columnist

Did you have yourself a Merry little Christmas Day? Gatherings continue with extended families and friends still celebrating Christmas while others prepare for parties and church services to bring in the New Year. Many have already cleared remnants of wrapping paper and tossed leftovers in the trash. Some have packed away manger scenes, snow villages, strings of lights, and stored fake trees – that looked so real – until Christmas comes in 2019. So, how was your Christmas? Did you fake happiness or were you truly happy amidst the wonder of it all?

Mother’s little calendar stirred this story when I flipped it to a day in December when my happy heart was broken into pieces I thought could never be put together again. December 27, 2014 was the day when God called my husband, James, Home to Heaven.

There is never a good time for a loved one to leave us but dealing with the sting of death during holidays can cripple happiness and stir recurring memories of sadness during special celebrations. Many people reading this story have experienced the heartbreak of death with your happy lives being turned upside down also. When death knocks on red letter days one wonders…’why now Lord, how can I ever be happy Father, is this really happening or will I wake up and my loved one will be by my side again’? Yet, time does not stop for us to catch our breath and bask in grief, people come and go, cards stop coming except for Brenda Nordin’s, there is no self help guide of ‘how to go on’ even though all around us…Life Goes On!

So, how do we deal with death? There is no easy explanation of how to adjust to life here when our loved ones are no longer with us. However, when we choose to trust God and give the reins to Him, He promises to bind our wounds, heal our hearts, and bring happiness when we choose to cast our cares upon Him. And He does! The Lord never leaves or forsakes us, even when we enter a Christmas Eve service alone and sit on a pew without a hand to hold or arm around our shoulders…even when we bring in the New Year by ourselves…He is with us!

‘How can we possibly be happy again’ – broken hearted people ask? We make the choice to go forth in faith and be happy or stew in sadness and be miserable for the rest of our lives. I choose happiness; how about you?

Precious memories of happy times with loved ones gone on before us can color our world with more joy than we think possible when reality of death rises up without rhyme or reason. A special song or place where good times were shared can prompt tears and take us to places where pits of pity threaten to steal happiness and stop new beginnings. Learn to embrace such times and do whatever works to keep Satan at bay while refusing to let sadness spoil happy days. I close my eyes and remember happy times together with Tim and James’ smiling faces in my mind. In those hard times, we can rest assured God has us engraved on the palm of His Hand and will see us through seasons of storms and sunshine too! Why? Because He loves us and longs for us to be happy and celebrate every day, remembering Him as our first love who brings happiness from heartaches and colors our world with love beyond measure when we put our trust in Him!

So, mother’s calendar is the reason for this end of year story when many people may feel sad and secluded! We may not have what we want as we welcome a New Year. Yet, we can cherish what we have and BE Happy! Whether we are drowning in grief or on top of the world with joy, take a leap of faith and begin this wondrous New Year by believing! Resolve to be happy with God as our cornerstone, Jesus our Best Friend, and His Holy Spirit guiding from within as 2019 begins!

Let the New Year begin and keep your focus on Him! Choose to continue your love story with Christ the main character and look out for blessings that will fill you up with more happiness than you can imagine.

Embrace Brad Paisley’s plan, “Tomorrow is the first blank page of a 365 page book…Write a Good One”!

Live each day by the words on mama’s calendar that sits on my windowsill with smudges from her precious fingerprints. Oh, the joy of memories made here and the awesome anticipation of Heaven and eternal happiness and hallelujahs awaiting each of us (if we have asked Jesus into our hearts, repented of our sins, believe in Him, forgive those who have hurt us, keep our hearts cleaned out, and trust and obey because we love Him so) when He calls us Home. Are you ready? If not, make getting your heart and home in order to meet Jesus at any time your number one New Year’s Resolution!

Mama’s calendar saying for the day challenges each of us to look deep within and live happily for Him and them – those who color your world with LOVE.

“We’d probably all be happier and live longer, like as not – If we’d stop craving things we want and want the things we’ve got!”

Happy New Year to each person who faithfully reads the stories God sends to my heart. Thank you for prayers and support throughout the year. May 2019 be filled with happy days as you press on in forward gear! Write your stories and enjoy living every day out loud in love…with no fear!

By Becky Spell Vann

Contributing columnist

Becky Spell Vann is the owner/operator of Tim’s Gift Love Ministry.

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

Woman who had 2 tumors removed agrees to donate kidney for co-worker’s husband

On Dec. 4, doctors at Stony Brook University Hospital will remove one of Kristine Gawlowski’s kidneys and implant it in Artie Surrey, 44, of Mastic Beach.

By Rachel Uda rachel.uda@newsday.com @Rachel_UdaUpdated November 29, 2018 5:00 AM

Original Url: https://www.newsday.com/news/health/william-floyd-colleagues-kidney-donation-1.24014152

Kristine Gawlowski has spent dozens of hours under the knife. Surgeons have carved two golf-ball sized tumors from her brain, which left half of her face paralyzed and required a series of reconstructive surgeries.

But when Gawlowski, 50, of Shirley, learned in February that she was eligible to donate her kidney to her co-worker’s husband, she didn’t have to think twice about undergoing another procedure.

“I always felt that I was lucky to be alive,” she said. “That there had to be a reason that I’m still here, so when I learned I was a match, there was no hesitation.”

On Dec. 4, doctors at Stony Brook University Hospital will remove one of Gawlowski’s kidneys and implant it in Artie Surrey, 44, of Mastic Beach.

Surrey has polycystic kidney disease and when he and his wife, Amy Surrey, learned that he would need a kidney donation a year ago, they started asking friends and family to get tested for compatibility.

Amy Surrey, a teaching assistant at Tangier Smith Elementary School, said they were desperate to find a donor, but she never wanted Gawlowski to get tested.

“Just knowing what she had been through, I didn’t want to see her go through more,” said Amy Surrey, 44.

But when Gawlowski, a monitor at Tangier Smith, learned that she and Artie Surrey were both O-positive, she took the test anyway and matched.

Though she was never nervous about the operation, Gawlowski said her four children were worried about how she’d hold up under the stress.

“They were scared at first, but I think they’re proud now,” she said.

Gawlowski underwent CAT scans, MRIs, chest X-rays and a battery of other tests to determine if she was healthy enough for another surgery. Doctors finally cleared her this fall for the operation.

“We hoped so many times we would get that call,” Amy Surrey said. “It was a huge relief.”

The Mastic Beach Fire Department will be hosting a spaghetti dinner for Gawlowski, to raise money to help cover some of her expenses as she recovers, according to Artie Surrey, a lieutenant for the department. The dinner will take place from 4-8 p.m. Dec. 2.

Artie Surrey, whose been on dialysis for the past six months, said Gawlowski’s donation is “like a light at the end of the tunnel” for him.

“There are really no words to describe it. I’m just very, very grateful,” Artie Surrey said. “Kristine is my hero.”

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

I have #KidneyDisease, but it is not who I am. Donor4Luis.com

South West Train Museum is so much fun!

I have made it a point to not let the constraints of kidney disease define who I am. I positively believe I will receive the kidney that I need; it is my intention to help and inspire others who are in the midst of this same battle.

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

Life is the flower for which love is the honey. -Victor Hugo

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

How to Be Happy: 25 Habits to Add to Your Routine

ORIGINAL URL: https://www.healthline.com/health/how-to-be-happy

Medically reviewed by Timothy J. Legg, PhD, CRNP — Written by Ann Pietrangelo on January 15, 2019

Yes, it’s possible
Happiness looks different for everyone. For you, maybe it’s being at peace with who you are. Or having a secure network of friends who accept you unconditionally. Or the freedom to pursue your deepest dreams.

Regardless of your version of true happiness, living a happier, more satisfied life is within reach. A few tweaks to your regular habits can help you get there.

Habits matter. If you’ve ever tried breaking a bad habit, you know all too well how engrained they are.

Well, good habits are deeply engrained, too. Why not work on making positive habits part of your routine?

Here’s a look at some daily, monthly, and yearly habits to help kickstart your quest. Just remember that everyone’s version of happiness is a little different, and so is their path to achieving it.

If some of these habits create added stress or just don’t fit your lifestyle, ditch them. With a little time and practice, you’ll figure out what does and doesn’t work for you.

Daily habits

  1. Smile
    You tend to smile when you’re happy. But it’s actually a two-way street.

We smile because we’re happy, and smiling causes the brain to release dopamine, which makes us happier.

That doesn’t mean you have to go around with a fake smile plastered on your face all the time. But the next time you find yourself feeling low, crack a smile and see what happens. Or try starting each morning by smiling at yourself in the mirror.

  1. Exercise
    Exercise isn’t just for your body. Regular exercise can help to reduce stress, feelings of anxiety, and symptoms of depression while boosting self-esteem and happiness.

Even a small amount of physical activity can make a difference. You don’t have to train for a triathlon or scale a cliff — unless that’s what makes you happy, of course.

The trick is not to overexert. If you suddenly throw yourself into a strenuous routine, you’ll probably just end up frustrated (and sore).

Consider these exercise starters:

Take a walk around the block every night after dinner.
Sign up for a beginner’s class in yoga or tai chi.
Start your day with 5 minutes of stretching. Here’s a set of stretches to get you started.
Remind yourself of any fun activities you once enjoyed, but that have fallen by the wayside. Or activities you always wanted to try, such as golf, bowling, or dancing.

  1. Get plenty of sleep
    No matter how much modern society steers us toward less sleep, we know that adequate sleep is vital to good health, brain function, and emotional well-being.

Most adults need about 7 or 8 hours of sleep every night. If you find yourself fighting the urge to nap during the day or just generally feel like you’re in a fog, your body may be telling you it needs more rest.

Here are a few tips to help you build a better sleep routine:

Write down how many hours of sleep you get each night and how rested you feel. After a week, you should have a better idea how you’re doing.
Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day, including weekends.
Reserve the hour before bed as quiet time. Take a bath, read, or do something relaxing. Avoid heavy eating and drinking.
Keep your bedroom dark, cool, and quiet.
Invest in some good bedding.
If you have to take a nap, try to limit it to 20 minutes.
If you consistently have problems sleeping, talk to your doctor. You may have a sleep disorder requiring treatment.

  1. Eat with mood in mind
    You already know that food choices have an impact on your overall physical health. But some foods can also affect your state of mind.

For example:

Carbohydrates release serotonin, a “feel good” hormone. Just keep simple carbs — foods high in sugar and starch — to a minimum, because that energy surge is short and you’ll crash. Complex carbs, such as vegetables, beans, and whole grains, are better.
Lean meat, poultry, legumes, and dairy are high in protein. These foods release dopamine and norepinephrine, which boost energy and concentration.
Highly processed or deep-fried foods tend to leave you feeling down. So will skipping meals.
Start by making one better food choice each day.

For example, swap a big, sweet breakfast pastry for some Greek yogurt with fruit. You’ll still satisfy your sweet tooth, and the protein will help you avoid a mid-morning energy crash. Try adding in a new food swap each week.

  1. Be grateful
    Simply being grateful can give your mood a big boost, among other benefits. For example, a recent two-part study found that practicing gratitude can have a significant impact on feelings of hope and happiness.

Start each day by acknowledging one thing you’re grateful for. You can do this while you’re brushing your teeth or just waiting for that snoozed alarm to go off.

As you go about your day, try to keep an eye out for pleasant things in your life. They can be big things, such as knowing that someone loves you or getting a well-deserved promotion.

But they can also be little things, such as a co-worker who offered you a cup of coffee or the neighbor who waved to you. Maybe even just the warmth of the sun on your skin.

With a little practice, you may even become more aware of all the positive things around you.

  1. Give a compliment
    Research shows that performing acts of kindness can help you feel more satisfied.

Giving a sincere compliment is a quick, easy way to brighten someone’s day while giving your own happiness a boost.

Catch the person’s eye and say it with a smile so they know you mean it. You might be surprised by how good it makes you feel.

If you want to offer someone a compliment on their physical appearance, make sure to do it in a respectful way. Here are some tips to get you started.

  1. Breathe deeply
    You’re tense, your shoulders are tight, and you feel as though you just might “lose it.” We all know that feeling.

Instinct may tell you to take a long, deep breath to calm yourself down.

Turns out, that instinct is a good one. According to Harvard Health, deep breathing exercises can help reduce stress.

The next time you feel stressed or at your wit’s end, work through these steps:

Close your eyes. Try to envision a happy memory or beautiful place.
Take a slow, deep breath in through your nose.
Slowly breathe out through your mouth or nose.
Repeat this process several times, until you start to feel yourself calm down.
If you’re having a hard time taking slow, deliberate breaths, try counting to 5 in your head with each inhale and exhale.

  1. Acknowledge the unhappy moments
    A positive attitude is generally a good thing, but bad things happen to everyone. It’s just part of life.

If you get some bad news, make a mistake, or just feel like you’re in a funk, don’t try to pretend you’re happy.

Acknowledge the feeling of unhappiness, letting yourself experience it for a moment. Then, shift your focus toward what made you feel this way and what it might take to recover.

Would a deep breathing exercise help? A long walk outside? Talking it over with someone?

Let the moment pass and take care of yourself. Remember, no one’s happy all the time.

  1. Keep a journal
    A journal is a good way to organize your thoughts, analyze your feelings, and make plans. And you don’t have to be a literary genius or write volumes to benefit.

It can be as simple as jotting down a few thoughts before you go to bed. If putting certain things in writing makes you nervous, you can always shred it when you’ve finished. It’s the process that counts.

Not sure what to do with all the feelings that end up on the page? Our guide to organizing your feelings can help.

  1. Face stress head-on
    Life is full of stressors, and it’s impossible to avoid all of them.

There’s no need to. Stanford psychologist Kelly McGonigal says that stress isn’t always harmful, and we can even change our attitudes about stress. Learn more about the upside of stress.

For those stressors you can’t avoid, remind yourself that everyone has stress — there’s no reason to think it’s all on you. And chances are, you’re stronger than you think you are.

Instead of letting yourself get overwhelmed, try to tackle the stressor head-on. This might mean initiating an uncomfortable conversation or putting in some extra work, but the sooner you tackle it, the sooner the pit in your stomach will start to shrink.

Weekly habits

  1. Declutter
    Decluttering sounds like a big project, but setting aside just 20 minutes a week can have a big impact.

What can you do in 20 minutes? Lots.

Set a timer on your phone and take 15 minutes to tidy up a specific area of one room — say, your closet or that out-of-control junk drawer. Put everything in its place and toss or give away any extra clutter that’s not serving you anymore.

Keep a designated box for giveaways to make things a little easier (and avoid creating more clutter).

Use the remaining 5 minutes to do a quick walk through your living space, putting away whatever stray items end up in your path.

You can do this trick once a week, once a day, or anytime you feel like your space is getting out of control.

  1. See friends
    Humans are social beings, and having close friends can make us happier.

Who do you miss? Reach out to them. Make a date to get together or simply have a long phone chat.

In adulthood, it can feel next to impossible to make new friends. But it’s not about how many friends you have. It’s about having meaningful relationships — even if it’s just with one or two people.

Try getting involved in a local volunteer group or taking a class. Both can help to connect you with like-minded people in your area. And chances are, they’re looking for friends, too.

Companionship doesn’t have to be limited to other humans. Pets can offer similar benefits, according to multiple studies.

Love animals but can’t have a pet? Consider volunteering at a local animal shelter to make some new friends — both human and animal.

  1. Plan your week
    Feel like you’re flailing about? Try sitting down at the end of every week and making a basic list for the following week.

Even if you don’t stick to the plan, blocking out time where you can do laundry, go grocery shopping, or tackle projects at work can help to quiet your mind.

You can get a fancy planner, but even a sticky note on your computer or piece of scrap paper in your pocket can do the job.

  1. Ditch your phone
    Unplug. Really.

Turn off all the electronics and put those ear buds away for at least one hour once a week. They’ll still be there for you later. If you still want them, that is.

If you haven’t unplugged in a while, you might be surprised at the difference it makes. Let your mind wander free for a change. Read. Meditate. Take a walk and pay attention to your surroundings. Be sociable. Or be alone. Just be.

Sound too daunting? Try doing a shorter amount of time several times a week.

  1. Get into nature
    Spending 30 minutes or more a week in green spaces can help lower blood pressure and depression, according to a 2016 study.

Your green space could be anything from your neighborhood park, your own backyard, or a rooftop garden — anywhere you can appreciate some nature and fresh air.

Better yet, add some outdoor exercise into the mix for extra benefit.

  1. Explore meditation
    There are many methods of meditation to explore. They can involve movement, focus, spirituality, or a combination of all three.

Meditation doesn’t have to be complicated. It can be as simple as sitting quietly with your own thoughts for 5 minutes. Even the deep breathing exercises mentioned earlier can serve as a form of meditation.

  1. Consider therapy
    We’re certainly happier when we learn how to cope with obstacles. When you’re faced with a problem, think about what got you through something similar in the past. Would it work here? What else can you try?

If you feel like you’re hitting a brick wall, consider speaking with a therapist on a weekly basis. You don’t need to have a diagnosed mental health condition or overwhelming crisis to seek therapy.

Therapists are trained to help people improve coping skills. Plus, there’s no obligation to continue once you start.

Even just a few sessions can help you add some new goodies to your emotional toolbox.

Worried about the cost? Here’s how to afford therapy on any budget.

  1. Find a self-care ritual
    It’s easy to neglect self-care in a fast-paced world. But your body carries your thoughts, passions, and spirit through this world, doesn’t it deserve a little TLC?

Maybe it’s unwinding your workweek with a long, hot bath. Or adopting a skin care routine that makes you feel indulgent. Or simply setting aside a night to put on your softest jammies and watch a movie from start to finish.

Whatever it is, make time for it. Put it in your planner if you must, but do it.

Monthly habits

  1. Give back
    If you find that giving daily compliments provides a needed boost to your mood, considering making a monthly routine of giving back on a larger scale.

Maybe that’s helping out at a food bank on the third weekend of every month, or offering to watch your friend’s kids one night per month.

  1. Take yourself out
    No one to go out with? Well, what rule says you can’t go out alone?

Go to your favorite restaurant, take in a movie, or go on that trip you’ve always dreamed of.

Even if you’re a social butterfly, spending some deliberate time alone can help you reconnect with the activities that truly make you happy.

  1. Create a thought list
    You arrive for an appointment with 10 minutes to spare. What do you do with that time? Pick up your cell phone to scroll through social media? Worry about the busy week you have ahead of you?

Take control of your thoughts during these brief windows of time.

At the start of each month, make a short list of happy memories or things you’re looking forward to on a small piece of paper or on your phone.

When you find yourself waiting for a ride, standing in line at the grocery store, or just with a few minutes to kill, break out the list. You can even use it when you’re just generally feeling down and need to change up your thoughts.

Yearly habits

  1. Take time to reflect
    The start of a new year is a good time to stop and take inventory of your life. Set aside some time to catch up with yourself the way you would with an old friend:

How are you doing?
What have you been up to?
Are you happier than you were a year ago?
But try to avoid the pitfall of judging yourself too harshly for your answers. You’ve made it to another year, and that’s plenty.

If you find that your mood hasn’t improved much over the last year, consider making an appointment with your doctor or talking to a therapist. You might be dealing with depression or even an underlying physical condition that’s impacting your mood.

  1. Reevaluate your goals
    People change, so think about where you’re heading and consider if that’s still where you want to go. There’s no shame in changing your game.

Let go of any goals that no longer serve you, even if they sound nice on paper.

  1. Take care of your body
    You hear it all the time, including several times in this article, but your physical and mental health are closely intertwined.

As you build habits to improve your happiness, make sure to follow up with routine appointments to take care your body:

see your primary care physician for an annual physical
take care of any chronic health conditions and see specialists as recommended
see your dentist for an oral exam and follow up as recommended
get your vision checked

  1. Let go of grudges
    This is often easier said than done. But you don’t have to do it for the other person.

Sometimes, offering forgiveness or dropping a grudge is more about self-care than compassion for others.

Take stock of your relationships with others. Are you harboring any resentment or ill will toward someone? If so, consider reaching out to them in an effort to bury the hatchet.

This doesn’t have to be a reconciliation. You may just need to end the relationship and move on.

If reaching out isn’t an option, try getting your feelings out in a letter. You don’t even have to send it to them. Just getting your feelings out of your mind and into the world can be freeing.

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

Amarillo business owner receives kidney donation from good samaritan

by Tiffany Lester

Wednesday, November 28th 2018

Original URL: https://abc7amarillo.com/news/local/amarillo-business-owner-receives-kidney-donation-from-good-samaritan

AMARILLO, Texas — An Amarillo business owner is getting a miracle just in time for the Christmas holiday. After sitting on a transplant list for nearly a year, Buzula furniture owner Buster Foster is receiving a new kidney. Anti-rejection drugs from a liver transplant ten years ago have been slowly destroying Foster’s kidneys.

“To get on a transplant list, your liver functions have to be at certain level,” said Foster. “That level typically is around ten percent. Right now, I’m under five.”

After pleading for donors on Facebook in February, Foster had three people attempt to donate, but they did not work out. Three months ago, though, Kristy Vaughn and her husband took tests to see if they could help Foster.

“I’m so excited that I get to be involved in this,” said Vaughn. “It’s something bigger than both of us.”

Her husband was not the right blood type, but she was a perfect match. Vaughn underwent several blood tests, psychological exams, as well as, CT scans and chest x-rays. She and Foster knew of each other in the past since he and her husband were in the Shriners together. It has been a deep friendship ever since they found out about the donor compatibility.

“She told me I’m going to give you my kidney, and as I do pretty easily these days, I just broke down crying. It was like what a blessing. She’s a rock, She’s been my strength,” said Foster.

In a twist of fate, transplant recipients are close to Vaughn’s heart.

“My husband had tissue from a cadaver and my nephew had to have a liver transplant. The fact that my family has been on the receiving end twice compelled me to want to do this. I thought well, ‘Why not? Nobody has to die,’” said Vaughn.

The transplant is scheduled for Dec. 5, 2018. They both said they are ready and excited for the future.

“I’m like, ‘Let’s do this! Let’s get it done yesterday.’ One of my favorite sayings is, ’worrying about anything doesn’t take away the problem, it only takes away today’s peace.’ So, I don’t worry about tomorrow,” said Vaughn.

Foster tells ABC 7 News that there are more than 100,000 people on the transplant list in the United States waiting for a kidney. Coffee Memorial Blood Center is hosting a special blood drive in Vaughn and Foster’s honor on Dec. 11. To learn more about becoming an organ donor, click here.

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.

Life-changing donations

By Bonnie Adams on November 28, 2018

Original Url: http://www.ephratareview.com/news/life-changing-donations/

Julie Sawyer’s unselfish decision to donate a kidney to a stranger as part of an innovative program sparked a positive chain of events that also helped save her husband’s life.

Worsening kidney disease left Michael Sawyer with two choices last year–start dialysis or wait up to six years for a transplant. He didn’t like either option and didn’t want to ask his siblings or adult children to donate.

“Then came my lovely wife,” he said. Michael said that at first, he didn’t embrace the idea her donating a kidney to him.

“Let’s just try,” she told him. Testing revealed that Julie was a donor match for him but she wasn’t the best candidate. The relatively small size of her kidneys was of concern. That’s when the Ephrata couple became part of the Paired Kidney Exchange through Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health. “I have the opportunity to change not one life, but two,” Julie said. She decided to donate her kidney to a stranger and thereby significantly shortened Michael’s wait for a transplant. He just had to wait for a suitable living donor.

“I can’t do dialysis for six years,” he remembered thinking. His kidney function had dwindled after 18 years with hereditary polycystic kidney disease that can destroy kidney function. Michael, 56, was retaining fluid, felt short of breath and fatigued and his kidneys had grown to the size of footballs. The Sawyers married nine years ago and have a blended family of five adult children. Their children were concerned for them both as Julie considered donating. She said she explained to them that she could help two people get a second chance at life by participating in the Paired Kidney Exchange.

“I think when the kids heard me say those words and they absorbed those words, they realized the magnitude of my decision,” she said. The couple got the news that a suitable living donor had been found for Michael about two weeks before their surgeries in September 2017.

“One day you get the call and it hits you,” he said. They took a trip to Virginia Beach before the transplant surgeries. Julie and their daughters stayed at the Clyde F. Barker Transplant House in Philadelphia for patients and families the night before her surgery.

“We had an anonymous individual pay for our room, which was such a blessing,” she said. Michael received his new kidney on Sept. 19, 2017, and Julie donated her kidney one day later at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. One post-op photo shows the couple holding hands as Michael sits in a wheelchair and Julie rests in a hospital bed. The couple doesn’t know who donated a kidney to Michael but they composed a letter and sent it to the donor via the Paired Kidney Exchange.

“It was so emotional for us to write that letter,” Julie said. Michael wanted the donor to know that he is taking good care of his new kidney. As the couple sat at their kitchen table this fall, he read the letter aloud. “Words will never begin to express my gratitude of your unselfishness to do this for a perfect stranger. You have given me and my family the opportunity to live a normal and fulfilling life. Many dreams I thought were impossible are now possible! My greatest wish for you is that your life will be one of health and happiness! The sacrifice that you and your family made will be remembered forever! God bless you! “

Julie only knows that her kidney was given to a recipient in Texas but they haven’t been in contact.

“If they wanted to reach out to me to say ‘thank you,’ that’s fine. I really don’t know if it’s a success,” she said.

Dr. Paige Porrett, Ph.D., is assistant professor of Transplant Surgery in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and responded to questions via email. “I do not know what the public’s perception is of the paired exchange. We are actually studying this now,” she said. Penn Medicine’s website said a common perception is that paired kidney exchange involves a single, two-way exchange between a donor and recipient who are acquainted or related but that rarely happens.

“Donors can direct their kidney to some extent but most times a more impactful swap can be built by exchanging kidneys between pairs across the nation,” Porrett said. The physician said Penn Medicine participates in the National Kidney Registry to match donors and recipients. She said living donors facilitate transplantation of their loved one so that they are removed from the wait list for transplantation. The Sawyers explained that is why Michael received a kidney so quickly.

He still has his own two kidneys plus the transplanted one. Julie explained that it would have been too invasive to remove his kidneys during the surgery. She said he will be evaluated to determine if that is an option later. After the surgery, fluid pressed against the new kidney and had to be drained. He was taking 28 pills daily and his white blood cell count dropped dangerously low.

“The doctors overnighted pre-filled syringes to administer to Mike. I’m not a nurse. I had to learn quickly and am happy to say that his blood levels have improved and stayed consistent. Mike will continue to take anti-rejection medication for the rest of his life.” Michael said that during a doctor’s visit this past September, he got good news. “She just made me happy. I’m down to 12 pills a day,” he said. He continues to work for Windstream Communications where he’s been employed for more than 30 years.

Julie, 55, who works in customer service for Armstrong World Industries, said she recuperated faster than her husband. She credited her employer for being supportive and allowing her to take short-term disability after her surgery.

“I sometimes remind myself that I donated a kidney. I feel just as good as I did before my donation, only the scar reminds me of that day.” Her doctors medically cleared her after six months so she could resume exercise. She has since run in races in Philadelphia, including the Donor Dash 5K that she described as an incredible experience.

“There were people running who have donated organs, people who received organs and family members of loved one who have passed and who gave the gift of life,” Julie said. “It was a very emotional day and one that I will never forget.”

Bonnie Adams is a correspondent for The Ephrata Review. Questions or comments may be sent to bonniebadams@yahoo.com.

My name is Luis Banda, I am 45 years old, O+ Blood Type, and I am looking for a living kidney donor. You can help me by sharing my story on your social media timelines, each share gets me closer to finding my living kidney donor. For more information on my specific donation please visit www.Donor4Luis.com

Please help me, I need a #LivingKidney donor. You can either contact Cedars Sinai Donor Coordinator on my behalf Jessica Iuga, jessica.iuga@cshs.org (310) 423-8463 or help me by sharing my story on #SocialMedia including #Facebook, #Twitter or #Instagram.